Case Study – Frozen Shoulder

Case Study – Frozen Shoulder

 

I have a client aged 53 who presented approximately 8 weeks ago diagnosed with Frozen Shoulder left side. At the time he had roughly 15% range of movement in his left shoulder going straight up from his hip and both forwards and backwards. His pain levels were high relying on endone from 4pm to sleep.

He has previously broken his right hip, and calcaneus as well as 3 broken ribs in a fall from a ladder approximately 3 years ago. He has disc problems in his lower back and a tear to his right subscapularis both long standing injuries.

Visually comparing his shoulders his right was sitting as normal while his left was lower and wider and his muscles were no longer hugging the glenohumeral joint but loose and weak.

He is an ideal client in many ways, happy to come weekly and determined to increase his range of movement (ROM) and reduce pain. We used Kinesiology and these are the goal statements we used for each of the first 6 weeks.

Week 1 – My muscular system and shoulders function free of dysfunction.

Week 2 – I have freedom of movement in my left rotator cuff.

Week3 – My shoulder muscles work in harmony. I am able to extend my arm over my head.

Week 4 – I increase my range of movement(ROM) and my body functions free of pain.

Week5 – I build strength and ROM in my left arm.

Week 6 –  I am easily able to do tasks that require exterior rotation of my shoulder without pain.

Kinesiology is a form of biofeedback muscle testing where you follow a succession of protocols, for example frozen shoulder massage, gaits, diet recommendations, essential oils or many other options depending on the skills and knowledge of the therapist, to gain health benefits. Kinesiology is aimed at strengthening the body’s ability to heal. So, I’m aiming at achieving congruency with the goal statement to align emotional and physical wellbeing.

In the six weeks since we started his ROM is sitting around 80 % and both his shoulder are sitting symmetrical.  He is more than impressed to be able to wash is hair with both hands and is able to place both hands behind his back. He has been endone free since week 4 and making steady progress towards having full ROM and freedom in his shoulder region.

Published with permission of client.

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Strategies to help with handwriting

Strategies to help with handwriting in children

 

Many children have difficulty with handwriting skills and brain integration. Primitive and postural reflexes have always been of interest to me especially supporting my children through school.  My knowledge is much better now than when they were smaller but everyone learns somewhere.

Starting at the beginning with the Palmer reflex. This is a primate reflex which emerges at about 11 weeks in utero and usually and lasts until about 4-6 months as a baby starts to focus and use hand eye coordination to reach for objects and begin exploring their world. This movement starts as a reflex and is most notable when a baby’s hand will grip whatever he touches and you need to pry their hands open. As they start reaching for items and developing their hand eye coordination the reflex is no longer needed.

The development of the pincer grip for picking up smaller items which often go straight to the mouth.  Using the thumb and forefinger is the forerunner for holding a pencil as well as being able to track and write from the board at school.  As a baby the hand will often then go straight to the mouth developing the fine motor skill incorporating hand and mouth movements. The Babkin Response (movement of the hand which will in turn purse the lips and open the baby mouth) is also key in developing handwriting but also because the mouth is also involved so smooth speech being able to coordinate hand and mouth movements together.

Task initiation can also be problem with children with hand writing problem. Problems in knowing where to begin planning tasks, starting projects independently, keeping track of possessions, keeping bedrooms and school bags tidy all seem to come up for children with poor hand writing skills

The early development of fine motor skills is crucial to handwriting skills , being able to shift focus from board to paper and spacial awareness and development of smooth speech.

These skills can be improved with exercise and coordination skills and developing core strength as the body core does not engage fully if a child has struggled with hand eye coordination problems.

Crossing the midline is great exercise for developmental skill. Helpful for visual tracking and reading and writing left to right, as well as throwing and catching a ball.

Kinesiology and fine motor exercise can build strength in the intrinsic muscles of the hand to help a child to improve their fine motor skills and develop  greater confidence in their handwriting ability, task inhiation and coordination.

Mind Body Integration 33 Fourth Street Lithgow 0448513171

This artwork pictured is a small peak at a scribble drawing by my daughter Beth Flynn and will be on display in Mosman Youth Prize from the 16th March 2018.

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Why do I need Kinesiology?

Kinesiology helps to restore health by balancing the body physically, mentally and emotionally.

So physically it can help with aches and pains. By circuit locating muscles which are reactive. A reactive muscle is a muscle behaving too strong (bully) while other muscles are switched off and not doing their job at all. When this situation is reversed it restores normal muscle tone. Trigger points also can be helped as well by targeting specific lympatic flow assisting knots to be released usually without the pain of deep tissue massage.

Mentaly, Kinesiology can help with anxiety, addictions, depression, obsessions and phobias.

On an emotionally level Kinesiology can help devellop self confidence, goal setting, strong relationships, self empowerment, creativity,  or improve work, sports, or school performance.

The mind body connection is amazing and you can start feeling empowereded by seeking out what information your body has to share with you.

I love sharing the pictures of Beth Flynn please enjoy this anatony drawing recently completed at the National Art School.

Phone for an appointment 0448513171 Amanda Spargo 33 Fourth St South Littleton. I work between the hours of 9am and 7pm Monday to Friday and Saturday mornings by appointment.

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Remedial Massage v Kinesiology

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Feminine mosaic on display in the garden

Back Pain

Back pain is a complaint I deal with on a daily basis as a Remedial Massage Therapist and a Kinesiologist.

I just want to explain the two different methods I use and how they can effectively deal with a common complaint.

REMEDIAL MASSAGE

Firstly as a Remedial Massage Therapist searching for the area of discomfort . I take note of posture as someone walks through the door, I look for symmetry or lack of symmetry . I take a full medical history including recent pain but also listening for past illnesses or accidents which may be grounds for further investigation. I work above and below the area indicated where the pain is coming from looking for over tight or weak muscles. If a client has a definite spinal problem such as scoliosis or herniated disc I would incorporate Craniosacral Therapy.  My particular favourite is working with scar tissue or fascia because the results can be highly rewarding.

KINESIOLOGY

Kinesiology like Remedial Massage I take a full client history with slightly more details. I ask if the client has ever had a Kinesiology session before and explain how I do a muscle test.  A muscle test can tell me if there is a reactive situation happening between muscles which particular muscle is too tight and which muscles have turned off and not working to provide support.  A muscle test can tell me whether massage is appropriate , Cranoisacral , acupressure and which particular points, if there is a scoliosis pattern involved, how the pelvis is sitting, if the TMJ is involved or a local balance is required. Kinesiology can tell me how the energy is flowing often the meridian called the Governing Vessel has restricted flow and this can leave us feeling unsupported in life. The other part of the body that needs looking at for a back problem is the core muscles and how they contribute to you feeling supported and your posture. Kinesiology can provide a plan for what can be done to improve flow and general wellbeing sometimes with massage , nutrition, colour, sound or even an essence to increase the feeing of support.

Both Remedial Massage and Kinesiology provide great options to improve range of movement and reduce pain levels.

Call for an appointment.

Hyview

33 Fourth st, South Littleton

0448513171