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Male normative alexithymia (MNA) was documented in 1992 by Ronald Levent.
He proposed his observations that many men had learnt to disguise, hide and fail to express their emotions because of embarrassment and not being seen as appropriate behaviour for a man.
Levant showed that men had the greatest problems with more vulnerable emotions like sadness and fear.
‘Normative’ is a play on the word normal, as in it’s not normal, but has been shaped by society.
Using terms in society such as man up, be tough and rub some dirt in it, be a man?
This reduces the ability to call on vulnerable emotions and reinforcing toughness in spirit. Often demonstrated and role modelled by fathers, brothers, familiar people but also a culture of not wanting to express vulnerability in front others.
This behaviour changes as a man grows older or has trauma and frequently he finds it more difficult to express emotions because he has been conditioned not to do so. It may feel outwardly difficult so they use poor behaviour as armouring to avoid being honest with their feeling.
It presents as a restriction in emotional expression, wanting to appear tough for others. He may appear to be unburdened by vulnerability. He may have an over inflated ego, or an inferiority complex which he presents as a superiority complex.
Men will often show a very competitive aura and not want to show any weakness. They may want to appear to always look on the bright side without acknowledging the pain or anger they feel from the suppression. They may act domineering to establish and maintain the appearance of being powerful, and be wilful and use ‘power over’ tactics avoid full expression of their feeling.
They may lack the ability to put words to feeling and not respond in a manner that is respectful to others. These emotional issues may develop into depression or anxiety and he have trouble maintaining relationships or push boundaries to assert themselves. Other unhealthy coping mechanisms may develop such as addictions or substance abuse.
Learning to identify the the belief and recognise the consequences is the first step forward. By using impulse control and learning to deal positively with criticism can slowing adjust behaviour can take some of the burden from their shoulders.
www.integration.net.au
... See MoreSee Less

Male normative alexithymia (MNA) was documented in 1992 by Ronald Levent.
He proposed his observations that many men had learnt to disguise, hide and fail to express their emotions because of embarrassment and not being seen as appropriate behaviour for a man. 
Levant showed that men had the greatest problems with more vulnerable emotions like sadness and fear. 
‘Normative’ is a play on the word normal, as in it’s not normal, but has been shaped by society.
Using terms in society such as man up, be tough and rub some dirt in it, be a man? 
This reduces the ability to call on vulnerable emotions and reinforcing toughness in spirit. Often demonstrated and role modelled by fathers, brothers, familiar people but also a culture of not wanting to express vulnerability in front others. 
This behaviour changes as a man grows older or has trauma and frequently he finds it more difficult to express emotions because he has been conditioned not to do so. It may feel outwardly difficult so they use poor behaviour as armouring to avoid being honest with their feeling. 
It presents as a restriction in emotional expression, wanting to appear tough for others. He may appear to be unburdened by vulnerability. He may have an over inflated ego, or an inferiority complex which he presents as a superiority complex. 
Men will often show a very competitive aura and not want to show any weakness. They may want to appear to always look on the bright side without acknowledging the pain or anger they feel from the suppression. They may act domineering to establish and maintain the appearance of being powerful, and be wilful and use ‘power over’ tactics avoid full expression of their feeling. 
They may lack the ability to put words to feeling and not respond in a manner that is respectful to others. These emotional issues may develop into depression or anxiety and he have trouble maintaining relationships or push boundaries to assert themselves. Other unhealthy coping mechanisms may  develop such as addictions or substance abuse.
Learning to identify the the belief and recognise the consequences is the first step forward. By using impulse control and learning to deal positively with criticism can slowing adjust behaviour can take some of the burden from their shoulders. 
www.integration.net.au

I think we loose life skills and ways of dealing with others in an authentic, understanding way as generations pass. When we don’t communicate why and how within relationships and basically be present enough to do so. This is partly due to high stress lifestyles and our need to have our presence seen rather than felt. Parts of ourselves fall short and these opportunities are lost for us.
When we don’t articulate our internal feeling and learn how to relate to the world externally in a way that is balanced. We loose our centre our core values and wind up focusing on stress and away from what’s important. Away from our own power dynamic. Over time we forget ways to relate with meaning.
In the same way same as way we loose animal species and plants species or even languages..This behavioural trend will also have consequences as all these pools gets smaller.
Our brains learn with hundreds of experiences and expressions it’s how we build procedural memory and executive functions. We learn from both parents how to relate, how to stay safe, why and how things work and many of their beliefs.
If we are upset as children and if we are brought up in a safe environment, we are calmed and settled and explained how and why and able to learn ways to calm our nervous system. So when as adults we have stress in our lives we react and then respond and recover in a way that is healthy.
If this cycles is not apparent from the beginning or we experience trauma that elicits a response such as fright or freeze. The trigger of the response is not reduced, in-fact there isn’t the understanding so our nervous system will stay in a heightened response and not learn to process in a healthy way. More than that it will learn that this response is normal for this person and events in our lives will also reflect this by our experiences until we come to understand its a cog in the system and when we are able to process the problem the anxiety goes away.
By understanding it’s a cog or a glitch that we haven’t dealt with. When we do deal with it our system rests and feels satisfied and finally moves into a different pattern. So when we process what happened in a more healthy way with insight and understanding.
So this experience represents a cross roads in our life.
We have 2 choices of how to deal with every situation, problem, stress, trauma whatever?
If we think I didn’t like that experience very much I’m going to do everything I can to avoid feeling that way. This is avoidance and no matter how much we use avoidance and try to run away from our experiences the results have the opposite effect to our wishes. It it like a hamster wheel by not dealing with the problem in a way that is secure our problems return and escalate and turn into something much larger like anxiety or depression.
Or we can look for meaning and understanding and how it fits in the jigsaw puzzle of life. It may represent the edge pieces. When we have this understanding in place many more of the pieces fit.
Within our energy system we learn to experience wholeness. By that I mean our system reacts, adjusts and comes back to a healthy centre much like we might have experienced if we were brought up in a safe environment.
This is when we have less chaos and when we start to experience a ‘power within’ mindset because we have the freedom to choose how we react to situations instead of being at mercy to them.
www.integration.net.au
... See MoreSee Less

I think we loose life skills and ways of dealing with others in an authentic, understanding way as generations pass. When we don’t communicate why and how within relationships and basically be present enough to do so. This is partly due to high stress lifestyles and our need to have our presence seen rather than felt. Parts of ourselves fall short and these opportunities are lost for us.
When we don’t articulate our internal feeling and learn how to relate to the world externally in a way that is balanced. We loose our centre our core values and wind up focusing on stress and away from what’s important. Away from our own power dynamic. Over time we forget ways to relate with meaning. 
In the same way same as way we loose animal species and plants species or even languages..This behavioural trend will also have consequences as all these pools gets smaller. 
Our brains learn with hundreds of experiences and expressions it’s how we build procedural memory and executive functions. We learn from both parents how to relate, how to stay safe, why and how things work and many of their beliefs. 
If we are upset as children and if we are brought up in a safe environment, we are calmed and settled and explained how and why and able to learn ways to calm our nervous system. So when as adults we have stress in our lives we react and then respond and recover in a way that is healthy.
If this cycles is not apparent from the beginning or we experience trauma that elicits a response such as fright or freeze. The trigger of the response is not reduced, in-fact there isn’t the understanding so our nervous system will stay in a heightened response and not learn to process in a healthy way. More than that it will learn that this response is normal for this person and events in our lives will also reflect this by our experiences until we come to understand its  a cog in the system and when we are able to process the problem the anxiety goes away.
By understanding it’s a cog or a glitch that we haven’t dealt with. When we do deal with it our system rests and feels satisfied and finally moves into a different pattern. So when we process what happened in a more healthy way with insight and understanding. 
So this experience represents a cross roads in our life. 
We have 2 choices of how to deal with every situation, problem, stress, trauma whatever?
If we think I didn’t like that experience very much I’m going to do everything I can to avoid feeling that way. This is avoidance and no matter how much we use avoidance and try to run away from our experiences the results have the opposite effect to our wishes. It it like a hamster wheel by not dealing with the problem in a way that is secure our problems return and escalate and turn into something much larger like anxiety or depression. 
Or we can look for meaning and understanding and how it fits in the jigsaw puzzle of life. It may represent the edge pieces. When we have this understanding in place many more of the pieces fit. 
Within our energy system we learn to experience wholeness. By that I mean our system reacts, adjusts and comes back to a healthy centre much like we might have experienced  if we were brought up in a safe environment. 
This is when we have less chaos and when we start to experience a ‘power within’ mindset because we have the freedom to choose how we react to situations instead of being at mercy to them. 
www.integration.net.au

Alexithymia is a Greek word, meaning without words for emotion is is also called emotional blindness. Alexithymia also makes it difficult for people to identify and distinguish between emotions and respond in a normal way to others.
Problems such as these can lead to difficulties in social settings and interpersonal relationships.
It isn’t considered a mental health condition as such but known to occur in unison with many mental heath conditions and neurological conditions such as Acquired Brain Injury, Epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington’s disease and others.
It is what they call a spectrum disorder and many people have a degree of alexithymia and as many as 10 percent of the population is affected.(Goerlich2018) Its particularly prevalent in elements of the population with ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorder.
It is unclear if alexithmia can happen from the result of early childhood trauma and the results not apparent to later in life.
It can start very early or it can be adaptive to circumstances and change.
It is thought to be caused through genetics with some people having a predisposition, others linked to past experiences amd trauma, and is apparent with certain medical conditions.
www.integration.net.au
... See MoreSee Less

Alexithymia is a Greek word, meaning without words for emotion is is also called emotional blindness. Alexithymia also makes it difficult for people to identify and distinguish between emotions and respond in a normal way to others. 
Problems such as these can lead to difficulties in social settings and interpersonal relationships.
It isn’t considered a mental health condition as such but known to occur in unison with many mental heath conditions and neurological conditions such as Acquired Brain Injury, Epilepsy, Alzheimers disease, Huntington’s disease and others. 
It is what they call a spectrum disorder and many people have a degree of alexithymia and as many as 10 percent of the population is affected.(Goerlich2018) Its particularly prevalent in elements of the population with ADHD  and Autism Spectrum Disorder. 
It is unclear if alexithmia can happen from the result of early childhood trauma and the results not apparent to later in life. 
It can start very early or it can be adaptive to circumstances and change. 
It is thought to be caused through genetics with some people having a predisposition, others linked to past experiences amd trauma, and is apparent with certain medical conditions. 
www.integration.net.au

Power within
Power within is the ability to recognise and see the world for what it is. To think for yourself, by considering evidence, live to your own values and draw your own conclusions.
Being able to think for yourself is the wisdom of being free. It encourages divergent thinking and reclaim’s independence of thought.
Power within is related to a person’s sense of self-worth and self-knowledge it’s the individual wisdom that determines behaviour that contributes to self determination.
To live with the awareness of how you can be influenced and reclaim culture.
Free yourself from others thinking and use your own judgement to make choices in your own best interests.
Without having your judgement clouded by others such as politicians, churches, corporations, media, schools, social groups , social media or family members.
When you behave independently using your own moral compass for what’s right for you at the same time in line with your core values so this also reflects respect for others.
By releasing the fear of being judged it easier to break down the wall that closes us in and create strength, vitality and creativity and strong structure for leadership.
www.integration.net.au
... See MoreSee Less

Power within 
Power within is the ability to recognise and see the world for what it is. To think for yourself, by considering evidence, live to your own values and draw your own conclusions. 
Being able to think for yourself is the wisdom of being free. It encourages divergent thinking and reclaim’s independence of thought. 
Power within is related to a person’s sense of self-worth and self-knowledge it’s the individual wisdom that determines behaviour that contributes to self determination. 
To live with the awareness of how you can be influenced and reclaim culture. 
Free yourself from others thinking and use your own judgement to make choices in your own best interests. 
Without having your judgement clouded by others such as politicians, churches, corporations, media, schools, social groups , social media or family members. 
When you behave independently using your own moral compass for what’s right for you at the same time in line with your core values so this also reflects respect for others. 
By releasing the fear of being judged it easier to break down the wall that closes us in and create strength, vitality and creativity and strong structure for leadership.
www.integration.net.au

Power to
Power to is the idea that every individual has the power to be able to make a difference and live to their own potential.
When we are authentic in our actions we are motivated by conscious intentions.
It provides the ability to expand and share knowledge, skills, talents, creativity in what’s fulfilling to create a meaningful life.
It empowers self understanding and looking with perspective and the ability to see situations from all angles to have many options rather than few.
‘Power to’ is when we have the stability to act within our centre regardless of external influences or a chaotic environment. To stand out from a crowd and use our own voice to speak our truth.
It is a positive heathy power that every individual has the power to fill their world with purpose and be productive and find fulfilling opportunities to give and receive with genuine vision and flow.
That people have the power to act from their centre, be grounded, have stable and formulate clear plans to accomplish something new or achieve goals.
www.integration.net.au
... See MoreSee Less

Power to 
Power to is the idea that every individual has the power to be able to make a difference and live to their own potential.
When we are authentic in our actions we are motivated by conscious intentions. 
It provides the ability to expand and share knowledge, skills, talents, creativity in what’s fulfilling to create a meaningful life. 
It empowers self understanding and looking with perspective and the ability to see situations from all angles to have many options rather than few. 
‘Power to’ is when we have the stability to act within our centre regardless of external influences or a chaotic environment. To stand out from a crowd and use our own  voice to speak our truth.
It is a positive heathy power that every individual has the power to fill their world with purpose and be productive and find fulfilling opportunities to give and receive with genuine vision and flow. 
That people have the power to act from their centre, be grounded, have stable and formulate clear plans to accomplish something new or achieve goals.
www.integration.net.au

Emotional fluency is often subdued in boys as they grow into men by elements of our culture and upbringing. Many men find it difficult to know how they are feeling and avoid situations for this to happen by becoming emotionally unavailable to their partners and families.
Increasingly reliant on mate-ship and ever increasing comradery to disappear from being available to a partner or family.
When men struggle to feel, they covertly experience depression, which manifests mostly as numbness, apathy, and boredom.
They can display cynical or aggressive behaviour often directed towards women.
Without having a range of feelings they become more limited in what and how they express themselves and the ability to recognise, and verbalise feelings.
By creating distractions they learn to turn away pain and numb it down with work, money, success, sex, addictions, drugs, and other distractions.
They can lack the presence and commitment to face the challenges created by this lack of communication and blame others for this emptiness rather than their own inability to express emotionally.
This is a big problem for men but an even bigger problem for women to cope with the added responsibilities and shortfalls men are creating by avoiding their feeling and responsibilities within relationships.
This problem is becoming more and more apparent as men’s mental health continues to decline.
Men are literally turning to other men for help but using avoidance, to mask the symptoms of mental health issues. No one wants to look weak in front of their mates. When using collective escapism and not openly addressing the problems we are actively creating bigger problems for more and more partners and families.
This perception of weakness feeds the toxic cycle and hence the source of the original problem.
Ironically this mate-ship does feed many addictions and contributes expeditiously to the economy.
National Alcohol and Other Drug Hotline
This hotline provides confidential support for people struggling with addiction. You can call the Alcohol Drug Information Service (ADIS) 24 hours a day, 7 days a week on 1800 250 015.
1800FULLSTOP 1800 385 578 (24/7 trauma-specialist counsellors) �1800RESPECT 1800 737 732 (24/7 support) �NSW Domestic Violence Helpline 1800 656 463 �NSW Sexual Violence Helpline 1800 424 017 (24/7 trauma-specialist counsellors) �Lifeline 13 11 14
... See MoreSee Less

Emotional fluency is often subdued in boys as they grow into men by elements of our culture and upbringing. Many men find it difficult to know how they are feeling and avoid situations for this to happen by becoming emotionally unavailable to their partners and families. 
Increasingly reliant on mate-ship and ever increasing comradery to disappear from being available to a partner or family.  
When men struggle to feel, they covertly experience depression, which manifests mostly as numbness, apathy, and boredom.
They can display cynical or aggressive behaviour often directed towards women. 
Without having a range of feelings they become more limited in what and how they express themselves and the ability to recognise, and verbalise feelings.
By creating distractions they learn to turn away pain and numb it down with work, money, success, sex, addictions, drugs, and other distractions.  
They can lack the presence and commitment to face the challenges created by this lack of communication and blame others for this emptiness rather than their own inability to express emotionally. 
This is a big problem for men but an even bigger problem for women to cope with the added responsibilities and shortfalls men are creating by avoiding their feeling and responsibilities within relationships. 
This problem is becoming more and more apparent as men’s mental health continues to decline. 
Men are literally turning to other men for help but using avoidance, to mask the symptoms of mental health issues. No one wants to look weak in front of their mates. When using collective escapism and not openly addressing the problems we are actively creating bigger problems for more and more partners and families. 
This perception of weakness feeds the toxic cycle and hence the source of the original problem. 
Ironically this mate-ship does feed many addictions and contributes expeditiously to the economy. 
National Alcohol and Other Drug Hotline
This hotline provides confidential support for people struggling with addiction. You can call the Alcohol Drug Information Service (ADIS) 24 hours a day, 7 days a week on 1800 250 015.
1800FULLSTOP 1800 385 578 (24/7 trauma-specialist counsellors) �1800RESPECT 1800 737 732 (24/7 support) �NSW Domestic Violence Helpline 1800 656 463 �NSW Sexual Violence Helpline 1800 424 017 (24/7 trauma-specialist counsellors) �Lifeline 13 11 14

Through out history there has been any number of leaders who have been tyrannical or self-centred. And that’s true of both men and women. Although we tend to think of leaders in our society as men, that is no longer true as our culture changes there is no longer a bias, as women rise far more frequently into positions of influence and power.
Women are often the leaders of a realm nowadays in terms of both in literal and in practical terms. Women also tends to be a more Heart Centred Leaders than men. This was clear in the recent Covid outbreak where Jacinda Ardern in a political setting lead New Zealand in a way that was both powerful and heart felt. There are so many women playing the king role, either through tyranny, abdication or choice.
I am enraged by systems which allow tyrannical leadership at any level. It is a misalignment of actions and ideals and needs to change on a myriad of levels and a more heart centred leadership be established.
Poor leadership may happen within families, friendship circles, school yards, workplaces, business, corporations, within consumerism, community organisations, and political structures.
Often help is unavailable to those most in need because of the uncomfortable feelings involved and the difficulty people have in speaking up for others.
Taking self responsibility for our own actions in respect to how we treat others on a personal level, but also being mindful of others mistreating others allows everyone to be the king.
www.integration.net.au
... See MoreSee Less

Through out history there has been any number of leaders who have been tyrannical or self-centred. And that’s true of both men and women. Although we tend to think of leaders in our society as men, that is no longer true as our culture changes there is no longer a bias, as women rise far more frequently into positions of influence and power. 
Women are often the leaders of a realm nowadays in terms of both in literal and in practical terms. Women also tends to be a more Heart Centred Leaders than men. This was clear in the recent Covid outbreak where Jacinda Ardern in a political setting lead New Zealand in a way that was both powerful and heart felt. There are so many women playing the king role, either through tyranny, abdication or choice.
I am enraged by systems which allow tyrannical leadership at any level. It is a misalignment of actions and ideals and  needs to change on a myriad of levels and a more heart centred leadership be established.
Poor leadership may happen within families, friendship circles, school yards, workplaces, business, corporations, within consumerism, community organisations, and political structures. 
Often help is unavailable to those most in need because of the uncomfortable feelings involved and the difficulty people have in speaking up for others. 
Taking self responsibility for our own actions in respect to how we treat others on a personal level, but also being mindful of others mistreating others allows everyone to be the king. 
www.integration.net.au

The King archetype in a positive state has strong foundations focused on love, self-worth, inner strength , stability and forthrightness. He is in full control of the situations that he is responsible for and able to take personal responsibility to provide a safe, secure environment for those in his care.
The King is within us all, whatever gender, and embodies the energy of leadership.
That means being a King who is fully engaged and capable of rising to the challenge of looking after his Kingdom,
being those people, situations and places for whom he or she is responsible.
By acting with authenticity, integrity, wisdom, clarity of thought, readiness to take action when necessary, with an inherent sense of morality, as well as the ability to protect all in his or her care.
He holds the ability to see clearly and take appropriate action that serves the greatest good of the greatest number of people within his care.
Kings throughout the ages have had responsibility to distribute wealth throughout the kingdom ensuring wise stewardship not just for the present but for the future generations of the kingdom.
www.integration.net.au
... See MoreSee Less

The King archetype in a positive state has strong foundations focused on love, self-worth, inner strength , stability and forthrightness. He is in full control of the situations that he is responsible for and able to take personal responsibility to provide a safe, secure environment for those in his care. 
The King is within us all, whatever gender, and embodies the energy of leadership. 
That means being a King who is fully engaged and capable of rising to the challenge of looking after his Kingdom,
being those people, situations and places for whom he or she is responsible.
By acting with authenticity, integrity, wisdom, clarity of thought, readiness to take action when necessary, with an inherent sense of morality, as well as the ability to protect all in his or her care.
He holds the ability to see clearly and take appropriate action that serves the greatest good of the greatest number of people within his care.
Kings throughout the ages have had responsibility to distribute wealth throughout the kingdom ensuring wise stewardship not just for the present but for the future generations of the kingdom.
www.integration.net.au

Power with

Power with is shared power that grows out of collaboration and relationships. It finds mutual understanding and respect and power itself is a shared commodity where there can be many points of view in order to achieve the next active step.
It is equal power in relationships where one individual does not take power away from the other for any reason.
It is a heathy dynamic based on mutual understanding and support. With a flexible mind and the ability to listen to differing opinions to evaluate options and choices.
It builds foundations for communities families and individuals. All is based on working together in a common, open and honest understanding with individual and group needs considered.
Power with can help foster relationships within groups such as families, organisations, or social change movements. It can be an advocate for change within and across differences such as gender, culture, or class. A recent example was marriage equality.
A balanced perspective with leadership qualities and fair and appropriate delegation of tasks.
There is no domination just the ability to work and act together and relate to each other within a harmonious balanced environment as well as to give and receive support when necessary from others.
www.integration.net.au
... See MoreSee Less

Power with 

Power with is shared power that grows out of collaboration and relationships. It finds mutual understanding and respect and power itself is a shared commodity where there can be many points of view in order to achieve the next active step. 
It is equal power in relationships where one individual does not take power away from the other for any reason. 
It is a heathy dynamic based on mutual understanding and support. With a flexible mind and the ability to listen to differing opinions to evaluate options and choices.
It builds foundations for communities families and individuals. All is based on working together in a common, open and honest understanding with individual and group needs considered.
Power with can help foster relationships within groups such as families, organisations, or social change movements. It can be an advocate for change within and across differences such as gender, culture, or class. A recent example was marriage equality. 
A balanced perspective with leadership qualities and fair and appropriate delegation of tasks. 
There is no domination just the ability to work and act together and relate to each other within a harmonious balanced environment as well as to give and receive support when necessary from others. 
www.integration.net.au
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Mind Body Integration, 33 Fourth St, South Littleton NSW 2790. Phone: 0448513171

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